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Re: [Statisticians_group] Re: A simple question?

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  • Frank Isackson
    Forgive me I should have typed feet not legs. Frank
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 2, 2006
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      Forgive me I should have typed 'feet' not legs.

      Frank


      On Mar 2, 2006, at 11:39 AM, Frank Isackson wrote:

      > determined from the
      > perspective of one sitting with his legs on the floor
    • Robert Newcombe
      I suspect that, as this list is based in India, the majority of list members will be more used to driving on the left - though for obvious reasons,
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 3, 2006
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        I suspect that, as this list is based in India, the majority of list
        members will be more used to driving on the left - though for obvious
        reasons, particularly in such a context one would now repudiate the
        word 'empire'. Though I've never seen an analysis of road traffic
        accident rates to compare countries driving on the left and the
        right - a comparison fraught with innumerable confounders - the
        argument in favour of right-hand drive vehicles, and hence driving on
        the left, is as follows. Most people are right-handed, and thus have
        better fine motor control with the right hand than with the left.
        Therefore, for a manual transmission vehicle, it seems logical to
        always have the right hand free to steer, and to use the left hand to
        change gear, for instance on roundabouts or spaghetti motorway
        (freeway) intersections. Clearly, in the US, automatic transmission
        is the norm and there are very few roundabouts, so these arguments
        don't apply with such force. Why, then, don't we change to driving
        automatics, and replacing roundabouts with traffic lights?
        Traditionally, automatics use substantially more fuel than their
        manual counterparts - to such a degree that I find it difficult to
        believe that the new model Yaris is more efficient with semi-
        automatic than with manual transmission. Also, if we replaced
        roundabouts with traffic lights here in the UK, the result would be
        to slow our congested traffic even further.

        Britannia waives the rules. (W.S.Gilbert)


        --- In Statisticians_group@..., Frank Isackson
        <fisackson@e...> wrote:
        >
        > Ah, Mr. Newcombe is still defending the empire of the absurd also
        > known as the land of driving on the wrong side of the road. This
        is
        > what you get from a people who try to make up for Benny Hill with
        > Monty Python.
        >
        > I can say, however, that in the automobile industry it is standard
        to
        > take left and right-handedness as being determined from the
        > perspective of one sitting with his legs (feet) on the floor, in
        the front
        > seat. In fear of being contradicted by former Yugo employees, let
        me
        > hasten to add this was the perspective of all American car
        companies
        > and Volkswagen for whom I either worked or against whom I competed.
        >
        > Rule Britannia. (or was it Einstein?)
        >
        > Frank Isackson
      • Jimmy Verner
        Well here in Texas, especially out in the country, some people drive down the center of the road. We call this taking your half out of the middle. Jimmy
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 3, 2006
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          Well here in Texas, especially out in the country, some people drive
          down the center of the road. We call this "taking your half out of
          the middle."

          Jimmy Verner
          DeSoto, Texas
          jverner@...

          On Mar 3, 2006, at 3:32 AM, Robert Newcombe wrote:

          > I suspect that, as this list is based in India, the majority of list
          > members will be more used to driving on the left - though for obvious
          > reasons, particularly in such a context one would now repudiate the
          > word 'empire'. Though I've never seen an analysis of road traffic
          > accident rates to compare countries driving on the left and the
          > right - a comparison fraught with innumerable confounders - the
          > argument in favour of right-hand drive vehicles, and hence driving on
          > the left, is as follows. Most people are right-handed, and thus have
          > better fine motor control with the right hand than with the left.
          > Therefore, for a manual transmission vehicle, it seems logical to
          > always have the right hand free to steer, and to use the left hand to
          > change gear, for instance on roundabouts or spaghetti motorway
          > (freeway) intersections. Clearly, in the US, automatic transmission
          > is the norm and there are very few roundabouts, so these arguments
          > don't apply with such force. Why, then, don't we change to driving
          > automatics, and replacing roundabouts with traffic lights?
          > Traditionally, automatics use substantially more fuel than their
          > manual counterparts - to such a degree that I find it difficult to
          > believe that the new model Yaris is more efficient with semi-
          > automatic than with manual transmission. Also, if we replaced
          > roundabouts with traffic lights here in the UK, the result would be
          > to slow our congested traffic even further.
          >
          > Britannia waives the rules. (W.S.Gilbert)
          >
          >
          > --- In Statisticians_group@..., Frank Isackson
          > <fisackson@e...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Ah, Mr. Newcombe is still defending the empire of the absurd also
          > > known as the land of driving on the wrong side of the road. This
          > is
          > > what you get from a people who try to make up for Benny Hill with
          > > Monty Python.
          > >
          > > I can say, however, that in the automobile industry it is standard
          > to
          > > take left and right-handedness as being determined from the
          > > perspective of one sitting with his legs (feet) on the floor, in
          > the front
          > > seat. In fear of being contradicted by former Yugo employees, let
          > me
          > > hasten to add this was the perspective of all American car
          > companies
          > > and Volkswagen for whom I either worked or against whom I competed.
          > >
          > > Rule Britannia. (or was it Einstein?)
          > >
          > > Frank Isackson
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