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Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

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  • sumalsn
    Dear Holmesians, We all know that Sherlock Holmes was the author of several monographs. To name a few, Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 6, 2013
      Dear Holmesians,
      We all know that Sherlock Holmes was the author of several monographs. To name a few,"Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos"," Monograph on polyphonic motets of Lassus",monograph upon the subject of secret writings etc.
      My question is what was the practical relevance of these monographs to his career. Is it possible to trace a culprit merely by identifying the type of cigar he uses?
      What are your views on the subject?
      Sumalsn
    • sridhar C
      Dear Sumal and fellow Holmesians, I wouldn t even pretend to understand what motet means, though I think it has something to do with musical composition
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 6, 2013
        Dear Sumal and fellow Holmesians,

        I wouldn't even pretend to understand what 'motet' means, though I think it has something to do with musical composition (Lassus was a composer - according to Wiki). We know Holmes was a music aficionado and even played brilliantly on his Strad when the fancy took him. No wonder then that he wrote a monograph on the subject.

        As to the one about the types of cigar/cigarette ashes, I seem to remember at least two adventures (HOUN and STUD) in which Holmes uses his unique ability to good effect. Personally, I have observed that among my few smoking friends, they stick to one particular brand of cigarettes and prefer going without when that brand is not available (brand loyalty, if you will).

        I am also confident that his monographs on secret writing and cyphers, tracing of footsteps, literature of tattoos, etc., have influenced modern policing. :)

         
        C. Sridhar
         
        All that is gold does not glitter,
        Not all those who wander are lost;
        The old that is strong does not wither,
        Deep roots are not reached by the frost.


        On Wednesday, November 6, 2013 8:00 PM, sumalsn <no_reply@...> wrote:
         
        Dear Holmesians,
        We all know that Sherlock Holmes was the author of several monographs. To name a few,"Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos"," Monograph on polyphonic motets of Lassus",monograph upon the subject of secret writings etc.
        My question is what was the practical relevance of these monographs to his career. Is it possible to trace a culprit merely by identifying the type of cigar he uses?
        What are your views on the subject?
        Sumalsn



      • sajan venniyoor
        Sumal asks, what was the practical relevance of these monographs to [Holmes ] career? From his earliest days with Holmes at 221B, Baker St., Watson was
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 7, 2013
          Sumal asks, "what was the practical relevance of these monographs to [Holmes'] career?"

          From his earliest days with Holmes at 221B, Baker St., Watson was astounded as much by Holmes' ignorance as by his knowledge. "Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it."

          "You appear to be astonished," he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. "Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it." [A Study in Scarlet]

          Holmes follows this up with some bosh about stocking the brain-attic with "nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work" and not filling it with 'useless facts'. 

          This, mind you, from the man who wrote a monograph on the Polyphonic Motets of Lassus and a Practical Handbook of Bee Culture, subjects no doubt more vital to the detective's craft than knowing that the earth goes around the sun. Holmes also studied the Buddhism of Ceylon, the Cornish language and its relation to Chaldean, and the Miracle Plays of the Middle Ages though I am not sure he got around to writing monographs on these abstruse subjects. 

          My guess is that Holmes, while feigning ignorance of astronomy, literature, philosophy and the arts in general, was merely pulling the gullible Watson's leg, as he often did. Those were the early days of their acquaintance. Except for bee keeping and polyphonic motets, his other monographs seem to be on subjects I'd consider very useful to a detective:
          • Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos
          • Two short articles on ears in the Anthropological Journal
          • A monograph upon the subject of secret writings; 160 separate ciphers analyzed
          • Monograph on the dating of documents
          • A contribution to the literature of tattoos
          • Monograph on the tracing of footsteps
          • Monograph on the influence of the trade upon the form of the hand
          • An article on how much an observant man might learn by accurate and systematic examination of all that came in his way 
          That last work alone -- The Book of Life -- proves there's no field of knowledge that Holmes disdained. 

          Sajan


          On 7 November 2013 13:58, <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...> wrote:
          Sherlock Holmes and his monographs
          Posted by: "sumalsn" no_reply@...   sumalsn
          > Wed Nov 6, 2013 8:00 pm
          >
          > Dear Holmesians,
          > We all know that Sherlock Holmes was the author of several monographs. To name a few,"Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos"," Monograph on polyphonic motets of Lassus",monograph upon the subject of secret writings etc.
          > My question is what was the practical relevance of these monographs to his career. Is it possible to trace a culprit merely by identifying the type of cigar he uses?
          > What are your views on the subject?
          > Sumalsn
        • Jay Ganguly
          Admirably argued! Though the Bee-keeping book was during his retirement, so I m not really sure it counts.   I like the perspective that perhaps Sherlock
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 7, 2013
            Admirably argued! Though the "Bee-keeping" book was during his retirement, so I'm not really sure it counts.
             
            I like the perspective that perhaps Sherlock was pulling his doctor's leg - there is certainly a significant number of philosophical remarks/quotes, often by Sherlock, throughout the canon. And he gets involved in political cases as well - so even if he has no interest in politics, he does know his politicians! Contemporary literature...ah, well, he knew of Dupin and Lecoq, didn't he?
             
            As for the polyphonic motet monograph - well, he's interested in music, as we all know, and religion - “There is nothing in which deduction is so necessary as in religion [...] It can be built up as an exact science by the reasoner." Enough interest for a monograph, isn't it?
             
            The idea of a brain-attic - or his "hard drive" and later, his "mind palace", as the new avatar calls it - is pretty cool, though. The method of loci and all.
             
            Cheers,
            Jay
             
            Jayantika Ganguly
            General Secretary & Editor
            Sherlock Holmes Society of India

            From: sajan venniyoor <venniyoor@...>
            To:
            Cc: "SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@..." <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
            Sent: Thursday, November 7, 2013 3:41 PM
            Subject: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

             
            Sumal asks, "what was the practical relevance of these monographs to [Holmes'] career?"

            From his earliest days with Holmes at 221B, Baker St., Watson was astounded as much by Holmes' ignorance as by his knowledge. "Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it."

            "You appear to be astonished," he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. "Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it." [A Study in Scarlet]

            Holmes follows this up with some bosh about stocking the brain-attic with "nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work" and not filling it with 'useless facts'. 

            This, mind you, from the man who wrote a monograph on the Polyphonic Motets of Lassus and a Practical Handbook of Bee Culture, subjects no doubt more vital to the detective's craft than knowing that the earth goes around the sun. Holmes also studied the Buddhism of Ceylon, the Cornish language and its relation to Chaldean, and the Miracle Plays of the Middle Ages though I am not sure he got around to writing monographs on these abstruse subjects. 

            My guess is that Holmes, while feigning ignorance of astronomy, literature, philosophy and the arts in general, was merely pulling the gullible Watson's leg, as he often did. Those were the early days of their acquaintance. Except for bee keeping and polyphonic motets, his other monographs seem to be on subjects I'd consider very useful to a detective:
            • Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos
            • Two short articles on ears in the Anthropological Journal
            • A monograph upon the subject of secret writings; 160 separate ciphers analyzed
            • Monograph on the dating of documents
            • A contribution to the literature of tattoos
            • Monograph on the tracing of footsteps
            • Monograph on the influence of the trade upon the form of the hand
            • An article on how much an observant man might learn by accurate and systematic examination of all that came in his way 
            That last work alone -- The Book of Life -- proves there's no field of knowledge that Holmes disdained. 

            Sajan


            On 7 November 2013 13:58, <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...> wrote:
            Sherlock Holmes and his monographs
            Posted by: "sumalsn" no_reply@...   sumalsn
            > Wed Nov 6, 2013 8:00 pm
            >
            > Dear Holmesians,
            > We all know that Sherlock Holmes was the author of several monographs. To name a few,"Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos"," Monograph on polyphonic motets of Lassus",monograph upon the subject of secret writings etc.
            > My question is what was the practical relevance of these monographs to his career. Is it possible to trace a culprit merely by identifying the type of cigar he uses?
            > What are your views on the subject?
            > Sumalsn


          • Binand Sethumadhavan
            ... I m not an expert, but the fact that he knew exactly where to find the story of Uriah s seduction of Bathsheba points to a level of biblical scholarship
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 7, 2013
              On 7 November 2013 15:41, sajan venniyoor <venniyoor@...> wrote:
              Holmes also studied the Buddhism of Ceylon, the Cornish language and its relation to Chaldean, and the Miracle Plays of the Middle Ages

              I'm not an expert, but the fact that he knew exactly where to find the story of Uriah's seduction of Bathsheba points to a level of biblical scholarship too, I imagine.

              Binand
            • RICHARD GILLMAN
              Hello, just as an aside, my latest short story, Sherlock Holmes and The Lymington Affair involves SH visiting Watson s aunt who keeps bees. The story is set in
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 7, 2013
                Hello, just as an aside, my latest short story, Sherlock Holmes and The Lymington Affair involves SH visiting Watson's aunt who keeps bees. The story is set in 1901 and so perhaps it is the trigger for SH's interest in bees! You will have to wait and see what develops. I hope to publish it by the end of the month.

                Kind regards,

                Dick





                From: Jay Ganguly <ruling_jay@...>
                To: "SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@..." <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
                Sent: Thursday, 7 November 2013, 12:26
                Subject: Re: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

                 
                Admirably argued! Though the "Bee-keeping" book was during his retirement, so I'm not really sure it counts.
                 
                I like the perspective that perhaps Sherlock was pulling his doctor's leg - there is certainly a significant number of philosophical remarks/quotes, often by Sherlock, throughout the canon. And he gets involved in political cases as well - so even if he has no interest in politics, he does know his politicians! Contemporary literature...ah, well, he knew of Dupin and Lecoq, didn't he?
                 
                As for the polyphonic motet monograph - well, he's interested in music, as we all know, and religion - “There is nothing in which deduction is so necessary as in religion [...] It can be built up as an exact science by the reasoner." Enough interest for a monograph, isn't it?
                 
                The idea of a brain-attic - or his "hard drive" and later, his "mind palace", as the new avatar calls it - is pretty cool, though. The method of loci and all.
                 
                Cheers,
                Jay
                 
                Jayantika Ganguly
                General Secretary & Editor
                Sherlock Holmes Society of India

                From: sajan venniyoor <venniyoor@...>
                To:
                Cc: "SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@..." <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
                Sent: Thursday, November 7, 2013 3:41 PM
                Subject: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

                 
                Sumal asks, "what was the practical relevance of these monographs to [Holmes'] career?"

                From his earliest days with Holmes at 221B, Baker St., Watson was astounded as much by Holmes' ignorance as by his knowledge. "Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it."

                "You appear to be astonished," he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. "Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it." [A Study in Scarlet]

                Holmes follows this up with some bosh about stocking the brain-attic with "nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work" and not filling it with 'useless facts'. 

                This, mind you, from the man who wrote a monograph on the Polyphonic Motets of Lassus and a Practical Handbook of Bee Culture, subjects no doubt more vital to the detective's craft than knowing that the earth goes around the sun. Holmes also studied the Buddhism of Ceylon, the Cornish language and its relation to Chaldean, and the Miracle Plays of the Middle Ages though I am not sure he got around to writing monographs on these abstruse subjects. 

                My guess is that Holmes, while feigning ignorance of astronomy, literature, philosophy and the arts in general, was merely pulling the gullible Watson's leg, as he often did. Those were the early days of their acquaintance. Except for bee keeping and polyphonic motets, his other monographs seem to be on subjects I'd consider very useful to a detective:
                • Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos
                • Two short articles on ears in the Anthropological Journal
                • A monograph upon the subject of secret writings; 160 separate ciphers analyzed
                • Monograph on the dating of documents
                • A contribution to the literature of tattoos
                • Monograph on the tracing of footsteps
                • Monograph on the influence of the trade upon the form of the hand
                • An article on how much an observant man might learn by accurate and systematic examination of all that came in his way 
                That last work alone -- The Book of Life -- proves there's no field of knowledge that Holmes disdained. 

                Sajan


                On 7 November 2013 13:58, <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...> wrote:
                Sherlock Holmes and his monographs
                Posted by: "sumalsn" no_reply@...   sumalsn
                > Wed Nov 6, 2013 8:00 pm
                >
                > Dear Holmesians,
                > We all know that Sherlock Holmes was the author of several monographs. To name a few,"Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos"," Monograph on polyphonic motets of Lassus",monograph upon the subject of secret writings etc.
                > My question is what was the practical relevance of these monographs to his career. Is it possible to trace a culprit merely by identifying the type of cigar he uses?
                > What are your views on the subject?
                > Sumalsn




              • shsieditors
                Oh, lovely! Wow, you re quite prolific, aren t you? Looking forward to it!! Cheers, Jay Sent on my BlackBerry® from Vodafone ... From: RICHARD GILLMAN
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 7, 2013
                  Oh, lovely! Wow, you're quite prolific, aren't you? Looking forward to it!!

                  Cheers,
                  Jay
                  Sent on my BlackBerry® from Vodafone

                  From: RICHARD GILLMAN <dick.g@...>
                  Sender: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...
                  Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2013 14:56:40 +0000 (GMT)
                  To: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...<SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
                  ReplyTo: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...
                  Subject: Re: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

                   

                  Hello, just as an aside, my latest short story, Sherlock Holmes and The Lymington Affair involves SH visiting Watson's aunt who keeps bees. The story is set in 1901 and so perhaps it is the trigger for SH's interest in bees! You will have to wait and see what develops. I hope to publish it by the end of the month.

                  Kind regards,

                  Dick





                  From: Jay Ganguly <ruling_jay@...>
                  To: "SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@..." <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
                  Sent: Thursday, 7 November 2013, 12:26
                  Subject: Re: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

                   
                  Admirably argued! Though the "Bee-keeping" book was during his retirement, so I'm not really sure it counts.
                   
                  I like the perspective that perhaps Sherlock was pulling his doctor's leg - there is certainly a significant number of philosophical remarks/quotes, often by Sherlock, throughout the canon. And he gets involved in political cases as well - so even if he has no interest in politics, he does know his politicians! Contemporary literature...ah, well, he knew of Dupin and Lecoq, didn't he?
                   
                  As for the polyphonic motet monograph - well, he's interested in music, as we all know, and religion - “There is nothing in which deduction is so necessary as in religion [...] It can be built up as an exact science by the reasoner." Enough interest for a monograph, isn't it?
                   
                  The idea of a brain-attic - or his "hard drive" and later, his "mind palace", as the new avatar calls it - is pretty cool, though. The method of loci and all.
                   
                  Cheers,
                  Jay
                   
                  Jayantika Ganguly
                  General Secretary & Editor
                  Sherlock Holmes Society of India

                  From: sajan venniyoor <venniyoor@...>
                  To:
                  Cc: "SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@..." <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
                  Sent: Thursday, November 7, 2013 3:41 PM
                  Subject: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

                   
                  Sumal asks, "what was the practical relevance of these monographs to [Holmes'] career?"

                  From his earliest days with Holmes at 221B, Baker St., Watson was astounded as much by Holmes' ignorance as by his knowledge. "Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it."

                  "You appear to be astonished," he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. "Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it." [A Study in Scarlet]

                  Holmes follows this up with some bosh about stocking the brain-attic with "nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work" and not filling it with 'useless facts'. 

                  This, mind you, from the man who wrote a monograph on the Polyphonic Motets of Lassus and a Practical Handbook of Bee Culture, subjects no doubt more vital to the detective's craft than knowing that the earth goes around the sun. Holmes also studied the Buddhism of Ceylon, the Cornish language and its relation to Chaldean, and the Miracle Plays of the Middle Ages though I am not sure he got around to writing monographs on these abstruse subjects. 

                  My guess is that Holmes, while feigning ignorance of astronomy, literature, philosophy and the arts in general, was merely pulling the gullible Watson's leg, as he often did. Those were the early days of their acquaintance. Except for bee keeping and polyphonic motets, his other monographs seem to be on subjects I'd consider very useful to a detective:
                  • Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos
                  • Two short articles on ears in the Anthropological Journal
                  • A monograph upon the subject of secret writings; 160 separate ciphers analyzed
                  • Monograph on the dating of documents
                  • A contribution to the literature of tattoos
                  • Monograph on the tracing of footsteps
                  • Monograph on the influence of the trade upon the form of the hand
                  • An article on how much an observant man might learn by accurate and systematic examination of all that came in his way 
                  That last work alone -- The Book of Life -- proves there's no field of knowledge that Holmes disdained. 

                  Sajan


                  On 7 November 2013 13:58, <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...> wrote:
                  Sherlock Holmes and his monographs
                  Posted by: "sumalsn" no_reply@...   sumalsn
                  > Wed Nov 6, 2013 8:00 pm
                  >
                  > Dear Holmesians,
                  > We all know that Sherlock Holmes was the author of several monographs. To name a few,"Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos"," Monograph on polyphonic motets of Lassus",monograph upon the subject of secret writings etc.
                  > My question is what was the practical relevance of these monographs to his career. Is it possible to trace a culprit merely by identifying the type of cigar he uses?
                  > What are your views on the subject?
                  > Sumalsn




                • RICHARD GILLMAN
                  Ah, there are benefits to being retired Jay! I do have to wait for a bit of inspiration before I can sit down and write a 1000 or so words. I use the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 7, 2013
                    Ah, there are benefits to being retired Jay!

                    I do have to wait for a bit of inspiration before I can sit down and write a 1000 or so words. I use the non-creative time to do a bit of research or look for an image to create the next front cover *;) winking

                    Cheers,

                    Dick



                    From: "shsieditors@..." <shsieditors@...>
                    To: "SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@..." <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
                    Sent: Thursday, 7 November 2013, 15:11
                    Subject: Re: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

                     
                    Oh, lovely! Wow, you're quite prolific, aren't you? Looking forward to it!!

                    Cheers,
                    Jay
                    Sent on my BlackBerry® from Vodafone

                    From: RICHARD GILLMAN <dick.g@...>
                    Sender: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...
                    Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2013 14:56:40 +0000 (GMT)
                    To: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...<SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
                    ReplyTo: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...
                    Subject: Re: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

                     
                    Hello, just as an aside, my latest short story, Sherlock Holmes and The Lymington Affair involves SH visiting Watson's aunt who keeps bees. The story is set in 1901 and so perhaps it is the trigger for SH's interest in bees! You will have to wait and see what develops. I hope to publish it by the end of the month.

                    Kind regards,

                    Dick





                    From: Jay Ganguly <ruling_jay@...>
                    To: "SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@..." <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
                    Sent: Thursday, 7 November 2013, 12:26
                    Subject: Re: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

                     
                    Admirably argued! Though the "Bee-keeping" book was during his retirement, so I'm not really sure it counts.
                     
                    I like the perspective that perhaps Sherlock was pulling his doctor's leg - there is certainly a significant number of philosophical remarks/quotes, often by Sherlock, throughout the canon. And he gets involved in political cases as well - so even if he has no interest in politics, he does know his politicians! Contemporary literature...ah, well, he knew of Dupin and Lecoq, didn't he?
                     
                    As for the polyphonic motet monograph - well, he's interested in music, as we all know, and religion - “There is nothing in which deduction is so necessary as in religion [...] It can be built up as an exact science by the reasoner." Enough interest for a monograph, isn't it?
                     
                    The idea of a brain-attic - or his "hard drive" and later, his "mind palace", as the new avatar calls it - is pretty cool, though. The method of loci and all.
                     
                    Cheers,
                    Jay
                     
                    Jayantika Ganguly
                    General Secretary & Editor
                    Sherlock Holmes Society of India

                    From: sajan venniyoor <venniyoor@...>
                    To:
                    Cc: "SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@..." <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...>
                    Sent: Thursday, November 7, 2013 3:41 PM
                    Subject: SHSI Re: Sherlock Holmes and his monographs

                     
                    Sumal asks, "what was the practical relevance of these monographs to [Holmes'] career?"

                    From his earliest days with Holmes at 221B, Baker St., Watson was astounded as much by Holmes' ignorance as by his knowledge. "Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it."

                    "You appear to be astonished," he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. "Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it." [A Study in Scarlet]

                    Holmes follows this up with some bosh about stocking the brain-attic with "nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work" and not filling it with 'useless facts'. 

                    This, mind you, from the man who wrote a monograph on the Polyphonic Motets of Lassus and a Practical Handbook of Bee Culture, subjects no doubt more vital to the detective's craft than knowing that the earth goes around the sun. Holmes also studied the Buddhism of Ceylon, the Cornish language and its relation to Chaldean, and the Miracle Plays of the Middle Ages though I am not sure he got around to writing monographs on these abstruse subjects. 

                    My guess is that Holmes, while feigning ignorance of astronomy, literature, philosophy and the arts in general, was merely pulling the gullible Watson's leg, as he often did. Those were the early days of their acquaintance. Except for bee keeping and polyphonic motets, his other monographs seem to be on subjects I'd consider very useful to a detective:
                    • Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos
                    • Two short articles on ears in the Anthropological Journal
                    • A monograph upon the subject of secret writings; 160 separate ciphers analyzed
                    • Monograph on the dating of documents
                    • A contribution to the literature of tattoos
                    • Monograph on the tracing of footsteps
                    • Monograph on the influence of the trade upon the form of the hand
                    • An article on how much an observant man might learn by accurate and systematic examination of all that came in his way 
                    That last work alone -- The Book of Life -- proves there's no field of knowledge that Holmes disdained. 

                    Sajan


                    On 7 November 2013 13:58, <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...> wrote:
                    Sherlock Holmes and his monographs
                    Posted by: "sumalsn" no_reply@...   sumalsn
                    > Wed Nov 6, 2013 8:00 pm
                    >
                    > Dear Holmesians,
                    > We all know that Sherlock Holmes was the author of several monographs. To name a few,"Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos"," Monograph on polyphonic motets of Lassus",monograph upon the subject of secret writings etc.
                    > My question is what was the practical relevance of these monographs to his career. Is it possible to trace a culprit merely by identifying the type of cigar he uses?
                    > What are your views on the subject?
                    > Sumalsn






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