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Contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes

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  • sumalsn
    Dear Holmesians, There were many contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes who never achieved the renown he had. One of the prominent contemporaries was Max Carrados
    Message 1 of 14 , 24 Apr

      Dear Holmesians,


      There were many contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes who never achieved the renown he had.   


      One of the prominent  contemporaries was Max Carrados created by Ernest Bramah, perhaps the first ever blind detective, in a series of popular stories for the Strand Magazine


      Although Carrados is blind, his other senses – especially his hearing – have more than made up for his lack of sight, and he can read newspaper print by touch and hear things which others are all but deaf to.


      The Max Carrados stories appeared alongside Sherlock Holmes  in the Strand Magazine, in which they often had top billing, and frequently outsold his eminent contemporary at the time, even if they failed to achieve the longevity of Holmes


      George Orwell declared them to be, along with Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes canon and R. Austin Freeman’s stories, the only detective stories since Poe  that are worth re-reading’.  


      Regards,

      Sumalsn

       

    • Tim Symonds
      Sumalsn, this is very interesting information about Carrados. By coincidence, I heard recently that it simply isn’t true that when a person goes blind the
      Message 2 of 14 , 25 Apr

        Sumalsn, this is very interesting information about Carrados. By coincidence, I heard recently that it simply isn’t true that when a person goes blind the other senses such as hearing sharpen up greatly to compensate.  Can anyone confirm or refute the belief the hearing grows more acute, for example?

         

        Tim

         

        From: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@... [mailto:SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...] On Behalf Of sumalsn
        Sent: 25 April 2017 05:39
        To: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...
        Subject: SHSI Contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes

         

         

        Dear Holmesians,

         

        There were many contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes who never achieved the renown he had.   

         

        One of the prominent  contemporaries was Max Carrados created by Ernest Bramah, perhaps the first ever blind detective, in a series of popular stories for the Strand Magazine. 



        Although Carrados is blind, his other senses – especially his hearing – have more than made up for his lack of sight, and he can read newspaper print by touch and hear things which others are all but deaf to.



        The Max Carrados stories appeared alongside Sherlock Holmes  in the Strand Magazine, in which they often had top billing, and frequently outsold his eminent contemporary at the time, even if they failed to achieve the longevity of Holmes



        George Orwell declared them to be, along with Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes canon and R. Austin Freeman’s stories, the only detective stories since Poe  that are worth re-reading’.  



        Regards,

        Sumalsn

         

      • Noufal Ibrahim KV
        There were several fictional detectives around that time. I ve read one or two stories of Carrados. They re very nice. My own personal favourite though is John
        Message 3 of 14 , 25 Apr
          There were several fictional detectives around that time. I've read one
          or two stories of Carrados. They're very nice.

          My own personal favourite though is John Thorndyke by R. Austin
          Freeman. A professor of forensic medicine, as I believe his creator was,
          Thorndyke explains the science behind all his work in much more detail
          than Holmes. It can make for tiring reading at times and Freemans rather
          wooden prose doesn't help much either but I do enjoy it. Anyone who
          wants a sample can get one of the books from the Internet Archive at
          https://archive.org/stream/eyeosirisadetec00freegoog?ref=ol#page/n10/mode/2up

          Many of the stories of the time were collected in a multi volume series
          rather aptly called "The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes"[1]. I recently
          managed to get a hardbound volume of the entire series from a local
          bookstore and it's been good reading so far.

          The stories were also adapted into a television series by the BBC with
          the same name[2]. It took some digging but I managed to get the set and
          watch it. Considering that it was made in 1971/72, it has aged rather
          well and I quite enjoyed it. There's one story with Max Carrados, two
          with Dr. Thorndyke, two with Martin Hewitt (who is another nice
          character), One with Lady Molly of the yard (who was, I think, the
          first female fictional detective), two with Professor Van Dusen
          aka. "the thinking machine" and lots more.

          I highly recommend the stories and the TV series to all the people on
          the channel.

          On Tue, Apr 25 2017, sumalsn wrote:

          > Dear Holmesians,
          >
          >
          > There were many contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes who never achieved the renown he had.
          >
          >
          > One of the prominent contemporaries was Max Carrados created by
          > Ernest Bramah, perhaps the first ever blind detective, in a series of
          > popular stories for the Strand Magazine.
          >
          >
          > Although Carrados is blind, his other senses – especially his hearing
          > – have more than made up for his lack of sight, and he can read
          > newspaper print by touch and hear things which others are all but deaf
          > to.
          >
          >
          >
          > The Max Carrados stories appeared alongside Sherlock Holmes in the
          > Strand Magazine, in which they often had top billing, and frequently
          > outsold his eminent contemporary at the time, even if they failed to
          > achieve the longevity of Holmes
          >
          >
          >
          > George Orwell declared them to be, along with Conan Doyle’s Sherlock
          > Holmes canon and R. Austin Freeman’s stories, ‘the only detective
          > stories since Poe that are worth re-reading’.
          >
          >
          > Regards,
          > Sumalsn
          >


          Footnotes:
          [1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rivals_of_Sherlock_Holmes_%28book_series%29

          [2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rivals_of_Sherlock_Holmes_%28TV_series%29

          --
          Cordially,
          Noufal
          http://nibrahim.net.in
        • sumalsn
          Dear Holmesians and Shri Noufal, Here is a fairly good analysis of Martin Hewitt,investigator
          Message 4 of 14 , 26 Apr
            Dear Holmesians and Shri Noufal,
            Here is a  fairly good analysis of Martin Hewitt,investigator

            However I wonder why despite being reviewed well, the works of other contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes just fell within the cracks but SH still stands shining bright. Is it due to the first mover advantage?
            Regards,
            Sumal S 

          • Pratik
            I don t think it s that,Sherlock Holmes did not have the first mover advantage but what I do think he had which his contemporaries lacked was individuality. He
            Message 5 of 14 , 26 Apr
              I don't think it's that,Sherlock Holmes did not have the first mover advantage but what I do think he had which his contemporaries lacked was individuality. He was not just a detective but a person everyone could relate to, he was eccentric ,an addict , a genius, fragile, strong, arrogant, humble all at the same time. In short he was more interesting as an individual rather than just as a detective.

              Cheers,
              Pratik

              On 26-Apr-2017 3:56 PM, sumalsn <no_reply@...> wrote:
               

              Dear Holmesians and Shri Noufal,

              Here is a  fairly good analysis of Martin Hewitt,investigator

              However I wonder why despite being reviewed well, the works of other contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes just fell within the cracks but SH still stands shining bright. Is it due to the first mover advantage?
              Regards,
              Sumal S 


            • Noufal Ibrahim KV
              On Wed, Apr 26 2017, sumalsn wrote: [...] ... I honestly don t know. It s something I ve given a considerable amount of thought to. I don t think it s because
              Message 6 of 14 , 26 Apr
                On Wed, Apr 26 2017, sumalsn wrote:


                [...]

                > However I wonder why despite being reviewed well, the works of other
                > contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes just fell within the cracks but SH
                > still stands shining bright. Is it due to the first mover advantage?

                I honestly don't know. It's something I've given a considerable amount
                of thought to. I don't think it's because of any inherent trait of
                Holmes himself, the character or anything like that. There were several
                detectives before him with their own idiosyncrasies and several after.

                I used to think that it was because of the language. Doyle was a much
                better writer than, say, Freeman but it's not so great as to completely
                eclipse all the others.

                I still don't have an answer but these days I gravitate to the idea that
                it was a series of lucky coincidences and accidents that put the
                detective on the pedestal and his creators name in the history
                books. Who knows?



                [...]



                --
                Cordially,
                Noufal
                http://nibrahim.net.in
              • Ron Lies
                Shri Pratik, Shri Noufai, Shri Noufai Sumal and fellow Holmesians, I agree with the Idea that Doyle had individuality in the way he wrote his stories that
                Message 7 of 14 , 26 Apr
                  Shri Pratik, Shri Noufai, Shri Noufai Sumal and fellow Holmesians, 
                    I agree with the Idea that Doyle had individuality in the way he wrote his stories that earlier detective story detective story writers did not. As has been said by Pratik Doyle could make Holmes and Watson interesting as individuals. Doyle also made me care about Holmes and Watson and what was happening to them. For example I knew that Holmes and Watson had to survive the attack of the deadly snake in the Speckled Band case. Yet that fact did nor stop me from saying look out Watson, When Holmes struck the match, started slashing at the bell rope and yelling Do you see it Watson? Doyle did bring them into the world of being believable but Doyle also brought Holmes and Watson into my world as individuals I cared about and still do. 
                  Namaste, Ron
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                   
                  
                  "Pratik prats.pratik@... [SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia]" <SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...> wrote:
                  
                   

                  I don't think it's that,Sherlock Holmes did not have the first mover advantage but what I do think he had which his contemporaries lacked was individuality. He was not just a detective but a person everyone could relate to, he was eccentric ,an addict , a genius, fragile, strong, arrogant, humble all at the same time. In short he was more interesting as an individual rather than just as a detective.

                  Cheers,
                  Pratik

                  On 26-Apr-2017 3:56 PM, sumalsn <no_reply@...> wrote:
                   

                  Dear Holmesians and Shri Noufal,

                  Here is a  fairly good analysis of Martin Hewitt,investigator

                  However I wonder why despite being reviewed well, the works of other contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes just fell within the cracks but SH still stands shining bright. Is it due to the first mover advantage?
                  Regards,
                  Sumal S 


                • sumalsn
                  Dear Shri Tim and Holmesians, To answer Shri Tim s query, it appears that there is no conclusive evidence to show that visually challenged persons have
                  Message 8 of 14 , 3 May
                    Dear Shri Tim and Holmesians,
                    To answer Shri Tim's query, it appears that there is no conclusive evidence to show that visually challenged persons have superior senses as compared to others. This link clarifies matters 
                    Regards,
                    Sumal S  
                     
                  • Tim Symonds
                    Many thanks for this interesting link, Sumal S. It seems to me humans and probably most animals (like cats) have the capacity to attend specifically to one
                    Message 9 of 14 , 3 May

                      Many thanks for this interesting link, Sumal S.  It seems to me humans and probably most animals (like cats) have the capacity to attend specifically to one sense when that sense is needed – for example, if there’s a burglar in your house in the middle of the night. Your hearing is the sense most needed in the dark and the mind concentrates hard on listening.  As a child I had a cat (‘Ginger’). When it glared out of the window into the garden at small birds, it concentrated so hard on watching them that I could creep up behind it and grab its tail which would make Ginger leap into the air with fright.  Clearly its sense of hearing had for the moment, while watching the birds, taken second place.

                      I presume if I lost my sight I would become very dependent on my hearing without that sense becoming especially enhanced by my condition.

                       

                      Does Holmes refer to the five senses in the canon (as against intuition)? 

                       

                      Tim

                       

                      From: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@... [mailto:SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...] On Behalf Of sumalsn
                      Sent: 03 May 2017 08:12
                      To: SherlockHolmesSocietyofIndia@...
                      Subject: Re: SHSI Contemporaries of Sherlock Holmes

                       

                       

                      Dear Shri Tim and Holmesians,

                      To answer Shri Tim's query, it appears that there is no conclusive evidence to show that visually challenged persons have superior senses as compared to others. This link clarifies matters 

                      Regards,

                      Sumal S  

                       

                    • sumalsn
                      Dear Holmesians, One of the interesting contemporary of Sherlock Holmes was the unnamed detective created by Baroness Orczy. The Old Man in the Corner is an
                      Message 10 of 14 , 3 May
                        Dear Holmesians,

                        One of the interesting contemporary of Sherlock Holmes was the unnamed detective created by Baroness Orczy. The Old Man in the Corner is an unnamed armchair detective who appears in a series of short stories written by her. 

                        The Old Man in the Corner examines and solves crimes while sitting in the corner of a genteel London tea-room in conversation with a female journalist,Polly Burton.

                        He was one of the first of this character-type created in the wake of the huge popularity of Sherlock Holmes

                        Regards

                        Sumal S



                      • Binand Sethumadhavan
                        ... Available here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/10556 Binand
                        Message 11 of 14 , 3 May

                          On 3 May 2017 at 17:23, sumalsn <no_reply@...> wrote:
                          One of the interesting contemporary of Sherlock Holmes was the unnamed detective created by Baroness Orczy.

                          Available here: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/10556

                          Binand
                        • sumalsn
                          Dear Holmesians and Shri Noufal, I am posting the link on Youtube to the Rivals of Sherlock Holmes TV series Shri Noufal had mentioned. Please watch it.
                          Message 12 of 14 , 4 May
                            Dear Holmesians and Shri Noufal,
                            I am posting the link on Youtube to the "Rivals of Sherlock Holmes" TV series Shri Noufal had mentioned. Please watch it.
                            Regards,
                            Sumal S

                          • sumalsn
                            Dear Holmesians, Father Brown is a Roman Catholic priest and amateur sleuth created in the early 20th century by GK Chesterton. He features in a series of 53
                            Message 13 of 14 , 8 May
                              Dear Holmesians,

                              Father Brown is a  Roman Catholic priest and amateur sleuth created in the early 20th century by GK Chesterton. He features in a series of 53 short stories where he solves mysteries and crimes using his intuition and keen understanding of human nature.

                              You can read the entire series here-

                              https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/c/chesterton/gk/c52fb/

                              Regards,

                              Sumal S




                            • sumalsn
                              Dear Holmesians, An article on Business Standard on Father Brown
                              Message 14 of 14 , 12 May
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